Brett's list of bits - stuff and things as well as things and stuff...
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firstlook.org
When anonymous officials are quoted verbatim and there isn't any real journalistic attempt to dig further you should be highly suspicious.
Posted: June 15, 2015 @ 10:14
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www.bostonglobe.com
It is very interesting to see how the US military/political scene views the rest of the world threat-wise. There is such a culture of fear within the US and looking out from inside - they are afraid of everything even though this is the safest they have ever been.
Posted: June 15, 2015 @ 09:58
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theaimn.com
This stuff is really important. Our politicians need to understand that what the law enforcement agencies are shoving down our throats is the thin end of the wedge.
Posted: March 17, 2015 @ 14:19
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shorttermmemoryloss.com
The lesson I take from this story is that data collected will always be used for purposes beyond which it is intended. In this case, police took footage from London cameras on the understanding it would only ever be used in case of national emergency. Now they retain it indefinitely and use it to solve normal crimes. But it can be used to track individuals regardless of criminal intent.
Posted: November 10, 2014 @ 08:26
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junkee.com
Bend over and kiss your arse goodbye. Pity that politicians are complete hypocrites. And also a pity that this isn't really about law enforcement - the first task will be for the movies studios around copyright infringement - so already this is extending beyond what it is meant to do and we haven't even got it through parliament yet.
Posted: October 30, 2014 @ 16:43
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www.eff.org
As will happen in Australia, the US government put an "anti-terrorism" clause into the Patriot Act that has been used thousands of times - almost none of them for terrorism-related investigations. Law enforcement (and governments) will use badly written laws to get what they want, no matter what.
Posted: October 29, 2014 @ 18:16
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www.alexaobrien.com
Recent laws proposed (and being passed) here in Australia and elsewhere are really justification for what our "law enforcement" and "intelligence" agencies have been doing all along. This page is very long but worth a read.

Basically, using metadata (you know, the stuff the Australian government says is safe to keep) you can be easily put onto a terror watchlist with no recourse.
Posted: October 2, 2014 @ 13:32
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www.theregister.co.uk
Metadata is where it is at - and the government is attempting to get as much of it as possible.
Posted: September 30, 2014 @ 14:19
Modified: September 30, 2014 @ 14:26
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newmatilda.com
And a friend of mine said this best:

Benjamin Franklin's commentary that “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety” still holds true in my opinion.
Posted: September 23, 2014 @ 14:47
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www.computerworld.com
The IoT (Internet of Things) is coming and your car will be just one of them (maybe many because there are lots of onboard computers). Where will that data go? Who will own it? Will the policy be able to give you a speeding ticket without actually seeing you do it?
Posted: September 19, 2014 @ 17:16
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www.newscientist.com
I can't believe that anyone would build embedded systems that are this insecure - particularly when they are being placed in public places. Just silly.
Posted: August 11, 2014 @ 08:39
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youtu.be
A video on how sound can be recovered from inanimate objects in a room. Very cool but with some significant privacy and surveillance implications.
Posted: August 5, 2014 @ 13:20
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firstlook.org
This is "security" out of control. And it smacks of what used to happen (might still happen) within the Soviet bloc during the cold war.
Posted: July 29, 2014 @ 14:32
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tech.slashdot.org
By any reasonable measure (payload; range; speed; theatre survivability) the plane is a dog. We should cut our losses. And it is a political football in the US too.
Posted: July 11, 2014 @ 17:19
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yro.slashdot.org
Government, big business - whatever. In this case, big US government surveillance and "justice" departments are conspiring to screw everyone over. I'd like to believe it is just incompetence but it goes too far for that.
Posted: June 5, 2014 @ 13:04
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www.alternet.org
No surprise to anyone who has been paying attention but the NSA (and others) have well crossed the legality line and it didn't have much to do with 9/11 - it was planned before then.
Posted: May 20, 2014 @ 17:05
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delimiter.com.au
Let's not turn Australia into the US...
Posted: April 14, 2014 @ 08:45
Modified: April 14, 2014 @ 08:45
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arstechnica.com
...if you're prepared to waste years of your life and significant funds to go to court. And even then the process is not certain. The only way you can find out you're on the list is to be denied entry to a flight - but then the US government won't confirm nor deny that you're on the list and there is no other recourse. Amazingly stupid system.
Posted: March 28, 2014 @ 09:35
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hosted.ap.org
I had such high hopes for Obama but not to be...
Posted: March 18, 2014 @ 14:33
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www.theguardian.com
National "security" agencies are doing their darndest to make sure that people don't know exactly (a) what they're doing and (b) how much they're interfering in people's lives. The only inference one can make here is that there are many laws being broken.
Posted: March 6, 2014 @ 14:53
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