Brett's list of bits - stuff and things as well as things and stuff...
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firstlook.org
When anonymous officials are quoted verbatim and there isn't any real journalistic attempt to dig further you should be highly suspicious.
Posted: June 15, 2015 @ 10:14
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motherboard.vice.com
...but the US says that China shouldn't have it.

This is stupid - the US was asking technology companies to put back doors into their products so that intelligence and law enforcement agencies could "track terrorists" and "find criminals". But this would weaken the products - and back doors could be exploited by anyone else, including those terrorists and criminals; generally making everything less safe.

But when China wants to do the same thing, the US is all "no - you can't do that" - becaus...
Posted: March 1, 2015 @ 08:01
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www.theguardian.com
Think again... The food creation industry has got some very neat tricks to take natural ingredients and make them into very interesting chemicals that are then used in food. And because they are "based on" actual plants and animal byproducts they can disguise how they are described on the labels.
Posted: February 23, 2015 @ 12:46
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www.news.com.au
Australia is on a list of nations that don't have a high regard for human rights. Well, played. NOT!
Posted: January 30, 2015 @ 09:37
Modified: January 30, 2015 @ 09:38
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www.abc.net.au
...but to condemn Charlie Hedbo as "the enemies of humanity" and praise the Paris gunmen clearly demonstrates who the real enemies of humanity are.
Posted: January 15, 2015 @ 19:17
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www.dw.de
After all the people in the US claiming that Australia's strict gun control laws contributed to the recent Sydney hostage/shooting incident - I wonder if they'll speak up about this then.
Posted: December 31, 2014 @ 08:05
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www.smh.com.au
Ostensibly to perform copyright infringement tasks but like very other filter on the planet it will be misused by the government (and probably other bodies). The farcical path is that the government won't admit it is a filter - even though that's exactly what it has to be in order to block sites considered to be in violation of copyright law.
Posted: December 14, 2014 @ 00:01
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junkee.com
Bend over and kiss your arse goodbye. Pity that politicians are complete hypocrites. And also a pity that this isn't really about law enforcement - the first task will be for the movies studios around copyright infringement - so already this is extending beyond what it is meant to do and we haven't even got it through parliament yet.
Posted: October 30, 2014 @ 16:43
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firstlook.org
I wonder how much we (can't) trust the Australian government.
Posted: September 15, 2014 @ 15:32
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theaimn.com
It's a pity the other parties are just as bad.
Posted: September 5, 2014 @ 09:54
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newmatilda.com
So the mainstream media gets all upset when other (Labour) politicians screw the taxpayer for a few hundred dollars in taxi fares - why not the same squealing when it is the PM? To admit that you created a media event just so you could go to a private party the night before is not only dishonest but probably illegal. And that's not to mention the $400-odd dollars in travel expenses - what about the rest of his entourage?
Posted: August 27, 2014 @ 12:37
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www.abc.net.au
Shame on the AFL to banning advertisements for humanitarian aid to Gaza.
Posted: August 7, 2014 @ 08:56
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www.wired.com
Actually, it probably isn't just tech but this is the world I live in. I don't understand why people (for the most part, men) care about gender (for the most part, female). I work with so many smart and business-savvy women - and on the other hand I've worked with many not-so-business-aware men that I really can't believe in the 21st century that this type of stuff still exists. But it does. Scary.
Posted: July 29, 2014 @ 13:36
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Companies in the US can choose not to supply certain types of birth control on their health insurance premiums if their religious beliefs are in conflict. So it's ok for the company to be able to exercise their beliefs but not ok for the person whose health is being covered?
Posted: July 3, 2014 @ 10:08
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www.abc.net.au
We've got no problem condemning people of Islamic faith but when it comes to Chinese superstition - it's ok because they have money.
Posted: June 24, 2014 @ 15:45
Tags: Hypocrisy
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yro.slashdot.org
Government, big business - whatever. In this case, big US government surveillance and "justice" departments are conspiring to screw everyone over. I'd like to believe it is just incompetence but it goes too far for that.
Posted: June 5, 2014 @ 13:04
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www.theguardian.com
...you were living in your own little fantasy world.
Posted: May 12, 2014 @ 23:57
Modified: May 13, 2014 @ 11:41
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www.smh.com.au
This has been going on for many years - and the worst thing is that it is legal. Companies are always looking to reduce their tax bill (it is in their best interests) but multinationals have a significant advantage over local companies at the game.

While it is highly disappointing to see companies shirk their responsibilities to the community as good corporate citizens, we must remember that their responsibilities are to their shareholders and no-one else. So the only fix is to change international l...
Posted: May 9, 2014 @ 13:46
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delimiter.com.au
And this is the original article in which Turnbull called for a cost/benefit analysis of the original NBN project. Hypocrisy indeed.
Posted: April 9, 2014 @ 16:27
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delimiter.com.au
First: the Telstra copper network is on the way out.

Second: NBN (over fibre) is the way of the future - it will deliver broadband equity and new services.

Now: Copper is fine for everyone.

Clearly he has to play the political game but this is hypocrisy in action.
Posted: March 17, 2014 @ 12:02
Tags: Hypocrisy, NBN
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